Economic Recovery? No Spinning These Numbers – August 2010 Lenders Foreclose More Homes Than At Any Time Since Mortage Crisis Began

US homes lost to foreclosure up 25 pct on year

LOS ANGELES — Lenders took back more homes in August than in any month since the start of the U.S. mortgage crisis.

The increase in home repossessions came even as the number of properties entering the foreclosure process slowed for the seventh month in a row, foreclosure listing firm RealtyTrac Inc. said Thursday.

In all, banks repossessed 95,364 properties last month, up 3 percent from July and an increase of 25 percent from August 2009, RealtyTrac said.

August makes the ninth month in a row that the pace of homes lost to foreclosure has increased on an annual basis. The previous high was in May.

Banks have been stepping up repossessions to clear out their backlog of bad loans with an eye on eventually placing the foreclosed properties on the market, but they can’t afford to simply dump the properties on the market.

Concerns are growing that the housing market recovery could stumble amid stubbornly high unemployment, a sluggish economy and faltering consumer confidence. U.S. home sales have collapsed since federal homebuyer tax credits expired in April.

That’s one reason fewer than one-third of homes repossessed by lenders are on the market, said Rick Sharga, a senior vice president at RealtyTrac.

[The reason only 1/3 of the foreclosed homes are  “on the market” is that the banks are tryoing to protect the value of their inventory of foreclosed homes, by limiting the number on the market thay are artificialy propping up the value of the “foreclosed home market”. The Government tax credit did not create “new housing demand” it simply shifted sales forward … Google: Federal Home Trac Credit Fraud – to read about the mismanagement of that program by the Federal Government – or Google: Mortgage Fraud Continues]

“These (properties) are going to come to market, but very slowly because nobody wants to overwhelm a soft buyer’s market with too much distressed inventory for fear of what it would do for house prices,” he said.

As a result, lenders are putting off initiating the foreclosure process on homeowners who have missed payments, letting borrowers stay in their homes longer.

The number of properties receiving an initial default notice – the first step in the foreclosure process – slipped 1 percent last month from July, but was down 30 percent versus August last year, RealtyTrac said.

Initial defaults have fallen on an annual basis the past seven months. They peaked in April 2009.

Barney Frank - Chairman House Banking Committee - The Man In Charge Of Watching Over Fannie

Still, the number of homes scheduled to be sold at auction for the first time increased 9 percent from July and rose 2 percent from August last year. If they don’t sell at auction, these homes typically end up going back to the lender.

More than 2.3 million homes have been repossessed by lenders since the recession began in December 2007, according to RealtyTrac. The firm estimates more than 1 million American households are likely to lose their homes to foreclosure this year.

[Realty Tracs number are way off, that or the AP is not reporting them correctly – At least 8 million homes have been foreclosed – 2.3 million homes have been foreclosed and placed on the market for sale. More than 2.3 million homes have been foreclosed in the States of Michigan and Nevada alone]

In all, 338,836 properties received a foreclosure-related warning in August, up 4 percent from July, but down 5 percent from the same month last year, RealtyTrac said. That translates to one in 381 U.S. homes.

The firm tracks notices for defaults, scheduled home auctions and home repossessions – warnings that can lead up to a home eventually being lost to foreclosure.

Among states, Nevada posted the highest foreclosure rate last month, with one in every 84 households receiving a foreclosure notice. That’s 4.5 times the national average.

Rounding out the top 10 states with the highest foreclosure rate in August were: Florida, Arizona, California, Idaho, Utah, Georgia, Michigan, Illinois and Hawaii.

Economic woes, such as unemployment or reduced income, are now the main catalysts for foreclosures.

Lenders are offering a variety of programs to help homeowners modify their loans, but their success rates vary. Hundreds of thousands of homeowners can’t qualify or fall back into default.

The Obama administration has rolled out numerous attempts to tackle the foreclosure crisis but has made only a small dent in the problem. Nearly half of the 1.3 million homeowners who enrolled in the Obama administration’s flagship mortgage-relief program have fallen out.

The program, known as Making Home Affordable, has provided permanent help to about 390,000 homeowners since March 2009.

[A program that was touted by Obama as something that would help 9,000,000 home owners at a cost of nearly $700 billion dollars has in fact helped only 300,000 and tens of thousands leave the program every month as their homes sink futher “under water”]

http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2010/09/16/general-us-foreclosure-rates_7933661.html?boxes=Homepagebusinessnews

 

AP Reports, “Rising unemployment accelerates foreclosure crisis”, Economy continues downward spiral. Credit Default Rates Up.

WASHINGTON – Relentlessly rising unemployment is triggering more home foreclosures, threatening the Obama administration’s efforts to end the housing crisis and diminishing hopes the economy will rebound with vigor.

In past recessions, the housing industry helped get the economy back on track. Home builders ramped up production, expecting buyers to take advantage of lower prices and jump into the market. But not this time.

These days, homeowners who got fixed-rate prime mortgages because they had good credit can’t make their payments because they’re out of work. That means even more foreclosures and further declines in home values.

The initial surge in foreclosures in 2007 and 2008 was tied to subprime mortgages issued during the housing boom to people with shaky credit. That crisis has ebbed, but it has been replaced by more traditional foreclosures tied to the recession.

Unemployment stood at 9.5 percent in June and is expected to rise past 10 percent and well into next year. The last time the U.S. economy was mired in a recession with such high unemployment was 1981 and 1982.

But the home foreclosure rate then was less than one-fourth what it is today. Housing wasn’t a drag on the economy, and when the recession ended, the boom was explosive. (The economic recovery of the 1980’s was fueled by Reagan’s tax cuts and a shrinking of Government – a formula we won’t see from this Administration).

No one is expecting a repeat. The real estate market is still saturated with unsold homes and homes that sell below market value because they are in or close to foreclosure.

“It just doesn’t have the makings of a recovery like we saw in the early 1980s,” says Wells Fargo Securities senior economist Mark Vitner, who predicts mortgage delinquencies and foreclosures won’t return to normal levels for three more years.

Almost 4 percent of homeowners with a mortgage are in foreclosure, and 8 percent on top of that are at least a month behind on payments — the highest levels since the Great Depression.

In the last 12 months, 15% of mortgages have had forclosure completed.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090716/ap_on_re_us/us_foreclosure_crisis_unemployment

Obama’s Trillion Dollar Mortgage Modification Program, which he promised would help 9,000,000 (9 Million), has in fact provided temporary relief to less than 75,000 (Seventy Five Thousand). Many of the 75,000 have, after receiving a modification, now slipped into foreclsoure anyway. 

Credit card defaults keep climbing

Default rates in May continue to rise as borrowers struggle with the weak job market.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — Banks continue to write off credit card debt as consumers hurt by record high unemployment default at an increasing rate.

Regulatory forms filed this week by some of the nation’s largest banks showed default rates on credit cards rose in May. The default rate is a measure of loans that the bank does not expect to be repaid.

“Data from May showed continued signs of stress for card issuers, reflective of worsening unemployment trends and deteriorating macro [economic] conditions,” analysts at Bernstein Research said in a report Tuesday.

Bank of America the nation’s largest bank, said its default rate jumped to 12.5% in May from 10.5% the month before. Other major banks, including Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase and Capital One also reported increases in May default rates.

http://money.cnn.com/2009/06/16/news/companies/credit_card_losses/index.htm?section=money_latest

Despite 90 Day Mortgage Moratorium in 2009 – Foreclosures Up 15%

Foreclosures rise 15 percent in first half of 2009

Foreclosures keep soaring as unemployment becomes main cause of housing woes

ap

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of U.S. households on the verge of losing their homes soared by nearly 15 percent in the first half of the year as more people lost their jobs and were unable to pay their monthly mortgage bills.

The mushrooming foreclosure crisis affected more than 1.5 million homes in the first six months of the year, according to a report released Thursday by foreclosure listing service RealtyTrac Inc.

The data show that, despite the Obama administration’s plan to encourage the lending industry to prevent foreclosures by handing out $50 billion in subsidies, the nation’s housing woes continue to spread. Experts don’t expect foreclosures to peak until the middle of next year.

Foreclosure filings rose more than 33 percent in June compared with the same month last year and were up nearly 5 percent from May, RealtyTrac said.

“Despite all the efforts to date, we clearly haven’t got a handle on how to address the situation,” said Rick Sharga, RealtyTrac’s senior vice president for marketing.

More than 336,000 households received at least one foreclosure-related notice in June, according to the foreclosure listing firm’s report. That works out to one in every 380 U.S. homes.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Foreclosures-rise-15-percent-apf-516022846.html?x=0

Since the election in November one home in every 76 has received at least one foreclosure notice.

Here We Go Again – Obama & Democrats Push For Increase In The Worst Of Risky Mortgages

I can hardly believe it when I read it.

As we all know the were two things that created our current economic turmoil, reckless government spending that we couldn’t afford and reckless lending in the mortgage market.  The bad mortgages were then packaged and sold as investment securities destroying 401’s and bank accounts all over the world.

Every day you’ll hear about the need for more regulation – That simply isn’t so – what we need is less Government spending and an end to reckless mortgage lending.

Get ready for the next round of “sub-prime mortgages”, Obama and the Democarts want to “double down” and increase the number of “high risk” mortgages funded through Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae were the first of the bailout babies – you and I and all of the other taxpayers in this Country have been gouged for about 7 Trillion dollars to buy up the earlier batch of “bad mortagges” these entities created.

So what is Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac up to now?

Obama Seeks To Refinance More Underwater Mortgages    

July 1, 2009 1:04 PM EDT

According to various reports, the Obama administration is stepping up their efforts to stem foreclosures and will start refinancing mortgages with a loan-to-value of as much as 125% through Fannie Mae (NYSE: FNM) and Freddie Mac (NYSE: FRE). The previous loan-to-value was 105%.
President Obama’s Making Home Affordable program sought to help up to 5 million mortgage holders refinance, but to date only 80,000 have been refinanced. (Sadly, of the 80,000, close to 50,000 have already  re-defaulted – what a failure). http://www.streetinsider.com/Economic+Data/Obama+Seeks+To+Refinance+More+Underwater+Mortgages/4767278.html
Consider this example – straight from the White House press release:
REFINANCING EXAMPLE
If your loan is held by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac and you are current on your mortgage payments, you may be eligible to refinance your mortgage loan even if your LTV is up to 125%. LTV, or loan-to-value-ratio, is a measurement that compares the principal balance of your loan (the amount you currently owe) to the actual value of the house. For example, if your loan amount is $300,000 and the current value of your home is $240,000, your LTV is 300/240, or 125%. http://www.streetinsider.com/Economic+Data/FHFA+Releases+Details+Of+Plan+To+Allow+Refinances+Up+to+125%25+LTV/4767700.html
So, now the Government plans on leneding up to $300,000 on homes worth only $240,000. (Plesae note that the average price of a U.S. home this month is $178,000).
 
Where does this money come from – Your Tax Dollars.
 
For those of you who are asking, “So what does this mean?”, the answer is this. The Government will now fund mortgages to those who are underwater or indefault, with taxpayer funds, and allow the individuals to obtain loans that are, as the example above states, worth substantially more than the homes being mortgaged are worth.
 
The riskiest of all of the sub-prime mortgages were those made with no down payment and where the loan to value was above 80%. The very worst were the 125% LTV loans.  
 
Are you asking, and what happens when the person re-defaults in 6 months and walks away with the $60,000 above the home’s value? Answer – THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER IS ON THE HOOK FOR THE MORTGAGE.
 
This is a receipt for deepening the current crisis – not resolving it. 
 
The answer isn’t additional “regulation”. The Government is “regulating” that this be done.
 
The answer is in electing Politicians with an ounce of common sense.    

Government Update: 1 Out Of 8 Mortgage Holders Are Now Delinquent Or Are In Foreclosure

12 percent are behind on mortgage or in foreclosure

AP

NEW YORK – A record 12 percent of homeowners with a mortgage are behind on their payments or in foreclosure as the housing crisis spreads to borrowers with good credit. And the wave of foreclosures isn’t expected to crest until the end of next year, the Mortgage Bankers Association said Thursday.

The foreclosure rate on prime fixed-rate loans doubled in the last year, and now represents the largest share of new foreclosures. Nearly 6 percent of fixed-rate mortgages to borrowers with good credit were in the foreclosure process.

At the same time, almost half of all adjustable-rate loans made to borrowers with shaky credit were past due or in foreclosure. There were no signs of improvement.

The pain, however, is spreading throughout the country as job losses take their toll. The number of newly laid off people requesting jobless benefits fell last week, the government said Thursday, but the number of people receiving unemployment benefits was the highest on record. These borrowers are harder for lenders to help with loan modifications.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090528/ap_on_bi_ge/us_foreclosures

Obama’s Economic Recovery Program Is Failing – New Wave of Mortgage Foreclosures, Unemployment Continues To Rise, Automakers Prepare to Shut Plants – Layoff 10’s Of Thousands

As job losses rise, growing numbers of American homeowners with once solid credit are falling behind on their mortgages, amplifying a wave of foreclosures.

In the latest phase of the nation’s real estate disaster, the locus of trouble has shifted from subprime loans — those extended to home buyers with troubled credit — to the far more numerous prime loans issued to those with decent financial histories.

With many economists anticipating that the unemployment rate will rise into the double digits from its current 8.9 percent, foreclosures are expected to accelerate. [Remember, the Obama Administration predicted a maximum unemployment rate of 8.9 in its projections of economic recovery- McAuley’s World]

That could exacerbate bank losses, adding pressure to the financial system and the broader economy.

“We’re about to have a big problem,” said Morris A. Davis, a real estate expert at the University of Wisconsin. “Foreclosures were bad last year? It’s going to get worse.”

Economists refer to the current surge of foreclosures as the third wave, distinct from the initial spike when speculators gave up property because of plunging real estate prices, and the secondary shock, when borrowers’ introductory interest rates expired and were reset higher.

“We’re right in the middle of this third wave, and it’s intensifying,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Economy.com. “That loss of jobs and loss of overtime hours and being forced from a full-time to part-time job is resulting in defaults. They’re coast to coast.”

Those sliding into foreclosure today are more likely to be modest borrowers whose loans fit their income than the consumers of exotically lenient mortgages that formerly typified the crisis. [Now that we have wasted 100’s of Billions in tax payer dollars helping the reckless and those not qualified to be homeowners, where is the assistance for those who played by the rules? Mc Auley’s World].

Economy.com expects that 60 percent of the mortgage defaults this year will be set off primarily by unemployment, up from 29 percent last year.

Over all, more than four million loans worth $717 billion were in the three distressed categories in February, a jump of more than 60 percent in dollar terms compared with a year earlier.

Under a program announced in February by the Obama administration, the government is to spend $75 billion on incentives for mortgage servicing companies that reduce payments for troubled homeowners. [The Obama Administration claimed the program would help 4 million home owners]. But three months after the program was announced, a Treasury spokeswoman, Jenni Engebretsen, estimated the number of loans that have been modified at “more than 10,000 but fewer than 55,000.” [Why can’t the Government be more exact than this – a 45,000 mortgage gap between 10,000 and 55,000. Where is the $75 Billion in Taxpayer money going? If the “true number” of modified mortagges is 10,000,  the Obama program cost taxpayers $7.5 million per mortgage. Who is kidding who? Someone is robbing the US Taxpayer blind] 

In the first two months of the year alone, another 313,000 mortgages landed in foreclosure or became delinquent at least 90 days, according to First American CoreLogic.

“I don’t think there’s any chance of government measures making more than a small dent,” said Alan Ruskin, chief international strategist at RBS Greenwich Capital.

Last year, foreclosures expanded sharply as the economy shed an average of 256,000 jobs each month. Since then, the job market has deteriorated further, with an average of 665,000 jobs vanishing each month.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/25/business/economy/25foreclose.html?pagewanted=1&sq=May%2025,%202009%20Mortgage%20foreclosures%20&st=cse&scp=1

GM announces an additional 47,000 job cuts amid palns to shut 5 US auto plants.   (February 2009). http://www.wilx.com/home/headlines/39750882.html

U.S. to steer GM toward bankruptcy … The Obama administration is preparing to send General Motors into bankruptcy as early as the end of next week under a plan that would give the automaker tens of billions of dollars more in public financing as the company seeks to shrink and re-emerge as a global competitor, sources familiar with the discussions told the Washington Post. http://scoop.chrysler.com/2009/05/22/us-to-steer-gm-toward-bankruptcy/

Chrysler confirms 6 additional plant closings – May 2009. http://scoop.chrysler.com/2009/05/06/chrysler-issues-plant-closing-statement/ 

GM plans to shut 14 more auto plants, reduce employees by 20,000.  (April 2009) Gm announces planned cuts did not go far enopugh, additional cuts planned. http://money.cnn.com/2009/04/17/news/companies/gm_jobs/?postversion=2009041712

From the WSJ: Mortgage Defaults, Delinquencies Rise

… A spokesman for the FHA said 7.5% of FHA loans were “seriously delinquent” at the end of February, up from 6.2% a year earlier. Seriously delinquent includes loans that are 90 days or more overdue, in the foreclosure process or in bankruptcy.

The FHA’s share of the U.S. mortgage market soared to nearly a third of loans originated in last year’s fourth quarter from about 2% in 2006 as a whole, according to Inside Mortgage Finance, a trade publication. That is increasing the risk to taxpayers if the FHA’s reserves prove inadequate to cover default losses. http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2009/03/fha-mortgage-defaults-increase.html

 

 

Housing Recovery? April foreclosures rise 32 percent!

MIAMI – The number of U.S. households faced with losing their homes to foreclosure jumped 32 percent in April compared with the same month last year, with Nevada, Florida and California showing the highest rates, according to data released Wednesday.

More than 342,000 households received at least one foreclosure-related notice in April, RealtyTrac Inc. said. That means one in every 374 U.S. housing units received a foreclosure filing last month, the highest monthly rate since the Irvine, Calif.-based foreclosure listing firm began its report in January 2005.

April was the second straight month with more than 300,000 households receiving a foreclosure filing, as the number of borrowers with mortgage troubles failed to abate.

The April number, however, was less than one percent above that posted in March, when more than 340,000 properties were affected. The March data was up 17 percent from February and 46 percent from a year earlier.

“We’ve never seen two consecutive months like this,” said Rick Sharga, RealtyTrac’s senior vice president for marketing. “It’s the volume that’s surprising.”

While total foreclosure activity was up, the number of repossessions by banks was down on a monthly and annual basis to their lowest level since March of last year, RealtyTrac said.

But that’s far from positive news. Because much of the foreclosure activity in April was in the default and auction stages — the first parts of the foreclosure process — it’s likely that repossessions will increase in coming months, RealtyTrac said.

About 63,900 homes were repossessed in April, down 11 percent from about 71,700 in March, RealtyTrac said. But the mortgage industry has resumed cracking down on delinquent borrowers after foreclosures were temporarily halted by mortgage finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, together with many other lenders.

“All of these loans are now being processed pretty rapidly by the servers,” Sharga said.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090513/ap_on_bi_ge/us_foreclosure_rates

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