After the Egyptian Revolution: The Wars of Religion

 

Christian Teen Killed In Egyptian Riot

After the Egyptian Revolution: The Wars of Religion

The angry, aggressive crowd formed within minutes of my arrival. Dozens of Muslim men came together in the middle of the dusty dirt path leading to the Church of the Two Martyrs in this village south of Cairo.

The men were determined to block access to what has become a sectarian sore: a church overrun by Muslim locals and desecrated.

“You can’t see it!” a group of men screamed.

In an armored personnel carrier, several soldiers in red berets watched the fracas from farther up the road.

Closer by, at least a dozen soldiers in flak jackets and helmets marched down an adjacent side street, barring anyone from following them. “You are not allowed to pass,” some of the men yelled at me. “Leave! Leave now!”

 “Are you Christian?” another asked.

“What are you going to see?” asked Mahmoud Mohammad, 30, who appeared to be their spokesman.
“Destroyed walls and a burned building?”

I told him I wanted to reach the church. 

“It’s not a church,” he said, raising his voice. “It is a meeting place, and we don’t want a church here,” he added before grabbing my notebook, ripping out several pages and forcibly marching me out of the village.

(THE CHURCH OF ST MINUS AND ST GEORGE HAS BEEN LOCATED ON THAT SITE FOR 1700 YEARS – 400 years before the start of Islam)

Egyptian Army Blocks Street

(The dispute started over a relationship between a Muslim woman and a Christian man. When the father of the woman refused to “maintain his family’s homor (by killing his daughter) the father was murdered by a cousin. In turn, the murdered man’s son, killed his father’s murderer.)

“After Friday prayers, some of the youth were angry and still mourning, so they came to the church looking for that filthy Christian,” Mohammad said, referring to the young man involved in the love affair.

They didn’t find him, but they ransacked the church. “We found wine (communion wine) and books against Islam,” (Bibles – most of the Muslim villagers can’t read) Mohammad claimed as other men interrupted to speak of other alleged wrongdoings by their Christian neighbors. “They rape our women!” one yelled. “They overcharge us at their stores!” said another.

It is unclear how many people were killed in Sole, but after Christians demonstrated in Cairo on Tuesday night against the desecration of the village church, a fight ensued with groups of Muslims, leading to violence that left 13 dead and 140 wounded.

New Year's Day Church Bombiing Victims - Attack Carried Out By Terrorists From The Gaza Strip

Tensions between Egypt’s majority Muslim population and Christians … rose sharply after a church in Alexandria was bombed on New Year’s Day. Twenty-one worshippers were killed in the attack.

Many of Sole’s Christian residents have fled, fearing further violence. Maher Sadiq, 26, isn’t one of them. He says many of the town’s Christian menfolk are staying to defend their homes. Sadiq, who says his house is on the same street as the church. “They’ve turned the church into a mosque,”he said by telephone. “There’s a banner in front of it that says ‘Al-Ramla Mosque.’ They’re not letting anyone go near the church. We will not leave. We’re prepared to die here.”

 Aziz Narooz, 27, and Hani Diab, 26, traveled from Sole earlier on Wednesday to join the hundreds of Coptic Christians maintaining a sit-in outside the state television headquarters. Many were sleeping on blankets spread out on the pavement. Most were carrying large wooden crosses. “People are scared. Some haven’t left their homes in days,” “They burned our church, they kicked around the statues of our saints” and “They tore up the Bible, and they’re still there.”

 

Sectarian Clashes in Egypt Challenge Revolutionary Idealism

 

Christians march from Cairo TV to Tahrir Sqaure

Sectarian Clashes in Egypt Challenge Revolutionary Idealism

 
CAIRO: On the banks of the Nile, in the middle of a roiling protest Wednesday by hundreds of chanting Christians, a man raised a Koran in one hand and a wooden cross in the other. “I came here because we don’t want sectarian strife,” said Ahmed Moustafa, a 37-year-old Muslim. “Muslims and Christians are united.”  

But such idealism might be waning as Egyptians confront the worst outbreak of religious violence since Hosni Mubarak was swept out of power Feb. 11. The deaths of 13 people in clashes in Cairo between Muslims and Christians late Tuesday have prompted calls for religious tolerance and raised the prospect of a deepening sectarian divide after a post-revolution honeymoon period. Street battles broke out after Copts set up roadblocks in major arteries to protest the destruction of one of their churches. Security is scant in this metropolis of 18 million, where the military-controlled government is still groping to find a way to tamp down crime with no functioning police force. 

Muslim Brotherhood gathers in Tahrir Square for counter protest

Although clashes between Muslims and Christians are not new in Egypt, they often take place far from the capital. That the overnight violence continued for hours near the heart of Cairo is bound to add to concerns among Christians that weeks of tumult in Egypt have left them particularly vulnerable in a country that is overwhelmingly Muslim. 

Some witnesses said that the Egyptian army had stood by for as long as four hours without intervening in the fighting.  http://aina.org/news/2011039212001.htm

Protesters march in Cairo after church attacks

Officials said that all of those who were killed died of gunshot wounds and that 140 others were injured. Copts said that all of the victims were Christian adherents, but other reports said that as many as five Muslims were killed.

SO MUCH FOR THE OFTEN REPEATED CLAIM THAT THE EYPTIAN MILITARY CAN PREVENT THE FUNDAMENTALISTS FROM TAKING CONTROL OF EGYPT.
 
AS THE SMALL NUMBER OF SECULAR LEFTISTS IN EGYPT IS SWEPT OUT OF THE WAY BY THEIR MASTERS, THE MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD, EGYPT PLUNGES FULL SPEED AHEAD INTO A REINCARNATION AS AN FUNDAMENTALIST ISLAMIC STATE.  

IRAN REPEATED.

Egypt’s Islamic Revolution: Christian-Muslim clashes in Egypt kill 11

Christians Killed In Church Attack

CAIRO – Security and hospital officials say Muslim-Christian clashes in the Egyptian capital Cairo killed 11 people and wounded more than 90.

The clashes broke out Tuesday night when a Muslim mob attacked thousands of Christians protesting against the burning of a Cairo church last week. Muslims torched the church in a Cairo suburb amid an escalation of tensions between the two religious groups over a love affair between a Muslim and a Christian that set off a violent feud between families of the couple.

The officials said Wednesday that the killed were six Christians and five Muslims.

They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

CAIRO (AP) — Clashes between Muslims and Christian in the Egyptian capital killed at least six people, security and

This car bonb killed 21 outside a Coptic Church in Egypt

 hospital officials said Wednesday.

They said the clashes took place late Tuesday night and lasted several hours. The fighting involved the use of guns, clubs and knifes, they added. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

The clashes began when several thousand Christians protested against the burning last week of a church in a Cairo suburb by a Muslim mob following a deadly clash between Muslims and Christians over a love affair between a Muslim and a Christian.

The Christian protesters on Tuesday blocked a vital highway, burning tires and pelting cars with rocks.

Burning Car Cairo

An angry crowd of Muslims set upon the Christians and the two sides fought pitched battles for about four hours. The six killed were believed to be mostly Christians who died of gunshot wounds.

Tuesday’s clashes are the latest evidence of the security vacuum in Egypt that followed the ouster on Feb. 11 of President Hosni Mubarak at the end of 18 days of anti-government protests. The police have pulled out from Cairo and several other cities three days into the uprising and are yet to fully take back the streets, a fact that has unleashed a wave of violent crime and even lawlessness in some parts of the nation.

Mubarak handed power to the military when he stepped down but it does not have enough troops to police every street in Cairo, a sprawling city of some 18 million people that, at the best of times, looks like it is about to descend into chaos.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110309/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_egypt

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