Egypt: Clashes in Cairo as Christians protest continued attacks by Muslims

Egypt: Clashes in Cairo as Christian protest attacked

15 May 2011

At least seven people have been injured in clashes at a Christian protest site in central Cairo, officials say.

The demonstrators outside Egypt’s state TV building were attacked overnight, with shots fired, petrol bombs thrown and cars set alight.

The Christians were protesting against attacks on two churches last weekend in which 12 people died.

There has been an increase in sectarian clashes since former President Hosni Mubarak was overthrown in February.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-13403504

Salafist groups find footing in Egypt after revolution

6 April 2011

While Western governments have long worried about Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, Egyptians are more concerned about the rise of Salafist groups, which have been blamed for a series of violent incidents in rural areas.

The Salafists have a strict interpretation of the Koran and believe in creating an Islamic state governed by Sharia law as it was practised by the Prophet Muhammad and enforced by his companions in the 7th Century.

They argue that the Muslim Brotherhood has become too focused on politics at the expense of religion. They try to turn Egypt to an Islamic state because they think there is a vacuum”

“An Islamic government is a government that is based on Sharia law”, said Abdel Moneem al-Shahat, a rising star of the Salafist satellite TV circuit. “Sharia can’t be changed because it comes from the days of Prophet Mohammed.”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12985619

Cairo clashes leave 24 dead after Coptic church protest

9 October 2011

At least 24 people have been killed and more than 200 wounded in the worst violence since Egypt’s former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted in February.

Clashes broke out after a protest in Cairo against an attack on a church in Aswan province last week which Coptic Christians blame on Muslim radicals.

Egyptian TV showed protesters clashing with security forces as army vehicles burned outside the state TV building.

A curfew is in force. The cabinet is to hold an emergency meeting on Monday.

Sectarian tensions have increased in recent months in Egypt.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-15235212

The Egyptian Revolution – Islamic Fundamentalist Take Control

Radial Islamist groups gaining stranglehold in Egypt                                                                                  

 The Telegraph, London  04/17/2011

 The rapid spread of Muslim political parties ahead of September’s parliamentary elections has strengthened fears that Egyptian democracy will be dominated by radical Islamic movements.

The Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s largest Islamic movement and the founder of Hamas, has set up a network of political parties around the country that eclipse the following of the middle class activists that overthrew the regime. On the extreme fringe of the Brotherhood, Islamic groups linked to al-Qeada are organising from the mosques to fill the vacuum left by the collapse of the dictatorship.

The military-led government already faces accusations that it is bowing to the surge in support for the Muslim movements, something that David Cameron warned of in February when he said Egyptian democracy would be strongly Islamic.

An Egyptian court on Saturday disbanded the National Democratic Party.

Mohammed Badie, the Muslim Brotherhood’s spiritual leader, last week predicted the group’s candidates would win 75 per cent of the seats it contested.

Fundamentalist factions have also emerged as parties. Gamaa al-Islamiya, an al-Qaeda linked group that promotes Salafist traditions has used its mosques as a political base for the first time since the 1970s.

A scare campaign that a No vote in last months referendum would eliminate Islamic law from the Egyptian constitution ensured a 77 per cent Yes result.

But the April 6th movement that spearheaded protests has no clear plan for party politics. Diplomats have warned the demonstrators are not well prepared for elections.

“The leadership of the protests was so focused on the street-by-street detail of the revolution, they have no clue what to do in a national election,” said a US official involved in the demonstrations. “Now at dinner the protesters can tell me every Cairo street that was important in the revolution but not how they will take power in Egypt.”

(What the Community Orgainzer started, the Muslim Brotherhood will finish)

Mahsud Arishie, a teacher visiting the square, said Egypt would be a different country in the wake of the uprising. “Muslims have their own space now where there is no pressure from the government, only a direct connection to the Lord in the sky,” he said as he made his way to the prayers. “That does not mean our country will be hostile to the West but it does mean we will do what we want.”

(Sounds very Iranian to me …. )

Amr Moussa, the Arab League president, has conceded that its inevitable that Islamic factions will be the bedrock of the political system.

As hardliners compete for street power, Egypt’s Christians – who make up 10 per cent of the population – are emigrating in growing numbers. Al-Masry al-Youm, an Egyptian newspaper, reported last week that the Canadian embassy had been swamped by visa requests from Coptic Christians. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8457030/Radial-Islamist-groups-gaining-stranglehold-in-Egypt.html

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